The vision

Transport systems impact on environment as well as usage of energy motivates improvement of IC engines in terms of efficiency and emission reduction. Regarding the real input on environment, IC engines with liquid hydrocarbons will continue to dominate in the future.
Alternative propulsion systems will achieve significant market-share and contribute to the security of energy-supply. Future heavy-duty engines will have to fulfil strict regulations for emission (including noise) as well as for greenhouse gas emissions and in particular CO2. It is therefore necessary to develop powertrain systems that, being cost effective, are able to face the medium-long term challenge of the global market and in the meantime are multi-variable to prepare the transition to the technology available after 2020.

The need for high specific engine output and optimised well-to-wheel efficiency of HD-engines based on hydrocarbon fuels will continue to be a driving factor. However, the expected reduction capacity of noxious exhaust gas emissions and particulate, beyond Euro 5, is much more difficult and risky in terms of cost and energy.
For delivery trucks and busses also gas engines with efficiency close to today's Diesel engines provide high potential for emission reduction in urban areas. Key issues in this field are new combustion developments with best air utilisation, homogeneous mixture, high in-cylinder peak pressure engines, including flexible components and advanced emission and aftertreatment systems, connected with model based closed loop control systems to fulfil simultaneously the objectives of extremely low CO2 and zero-impact emissions during transient conditions as well as noise.

Heavy Duty Vehicle Powertrain Road Map
Heavy Duty Vehicle Powertrain Road Map


The vision for future heavy-duty engines is a 'green' engine technology, which combines highest efficiency from well to wheel with zero-impact emissions and significant reduction of CO2. It will be characterised by an advanced integrated combustion process and the integration of an advanced aftertreatment system to a single unit. Both combustion process and aftertreatment will interact by a model-based control system, as today‘s sensor reaction times are too slow for transient operation. Flexible engine components offer potential for fuel-consumption reduction and optimised control integration of combustion and exhaust aftertreatment (Fig B0.2).

The GREEN vision of ONE System
The GREEN vision of ONE System


The operation with modified liquid hydrocarbon-based fuels (pure and blended diesel) and gaseous fuels offers the cost/benefit optimum for HD engines in the future. For buses and delivery trucks in urban areas, gas engines with efficiency close to today's HD diesel engines, taking into account near-zero-emission targets, will be an issue.

Future fuel scenario for heavy duty powertrains
Future fuel scenario for heavy duty powertrains


Special attention will be given to new designed bio and/or alternative diesel-fuels and natural gas, because of their important role regarding future fuel consumption and emission.